Getting yourself sorted in Copenhagen

Getting yourself sorted in Copenhagen

One of the things I mentioned previously that could contribute to the moving blues is the inability to perform simple administration. To aid anyone else in a similar position as me moving to Denmark, here’s the order I would recommend sorting yourself out with the official authorities.

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Oh dang! I need my nøglekort!

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Beat the Moving Blues!

Beat the Moving Blues!

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You’ve unpacked. Now what?

I’m really enjoying my move to Copenhagen but no matter how much the sun is shining, how friendly and nice the new people I’ve met and will meet are, there’s no doubt that I will experience a pang of homesickness or loneliness every now and then. This is normal and I will get over it soon enough. If you’re experiencing the moving blues, here are some tips from some of my friends who have done or are going through the moving thing:

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Aside

Choosing your career path and your PhD – a summary

We have come to the end of the post-PhD career profile series where we’ve heard from my friends who have left academia and those who have stayed. I hope that it was useful and inspiring for those who are currently doing a PhD. You may have noticed that people left/stayed in academia for many different reasons. There isn’t a formula for what you should or shouldn’t do but I have noticed some trends which I want to summarise.

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Post-PhD career profile – Postdoc at Sloan Kettering Institute

Post-PhD career profile – Postdoc at Sloan Kettering Institute

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Néstor is enjoying his current role in New York

Néstor Sáiz, Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Centre, New York , USA

Néstor did his PhD in Developmental Biology at the University of Manchester. His PhD focussed on how cells in the early mammalian embryo coordinate their fate decision-making and their spatial arrangement. After his PhD, he moved across the Atlantic to pursue his academic career in New York. “I continue to work in academia because I enjoy having the chance to think about the general principles that underlie biological processes and to dictate the focus of my own research.

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Post-PhD career profile – Associate Medical Writer at QXV Comms

Post-PhD career profile – Associate Medical Writer at QXV Comms

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Becky took some time to travel around Asia before returning to Manchester

Becky Hurst, Associate Medical Writer at QXV Comms, Manchester, UK

Becky did her PhD in Immunology at the University of Manchester. After her PhD, she stayed as a postdoc in the same lab to publish some papers. She then decided to make the bold move to Singapore to do a second postdoc at Nanyang Technological University. “During my second post-doc I decided that I wanted to:

  1. Move back to the uk;
  2. Have a more structured job with shorter deadlines;
  3. Not have to stay at work until 3am on the flow cytometer!

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Post-PhD career profile – Project Manager at Imperial College London

Post-PhD career profile – Project Manager at Imperial College London

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Emma went travelling after her PhD and is currently an academic project manager

Emma Lawrence, Project Manager at Imperial College London, London, UK

Emma did her PhD in Immunology on helminth (parasitic worm) infection at the University of Manchester. Directly after her PhD she remained as a postdoc in the lab for 3 months to finish off papers and then went travelling in South America. She knew that a postdoc was not for her and categorically listed 3 things she was sure that a postdoc would not fulfil:

  1. I wanted a career with more short-term goals; I am more motivated and enjoy achievements that can be done in a shorter space of time than a publication.
  2. I did not want the responsibility of self-funding, at least at some point this is important, and eventually you are responsible for funding others.
  3. I didn’t believe accomplishments in science are fairly rewarded; i.e. it is papers not hard work that counts.

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